Confectionery Products Handbook (Chocolate, Toffees, Chewing Gum & Sugar Free Confectionery)

Confectionery Products Handbook (Chocolate, Toffees, Chewing Gum & Sugar Free Confectionery)

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Confectionery manufacture has been dominated by large-scale industrial processing for several decades. Confectionery implies the food items that are rich in sugar and often referred to as a confection and refers to the art of creating sugar based dessert forms, or subtleties (subtlety or sotelty), often with pastillage. The simplest and earliest confection used by man was honey, dating back over 3000 years ago. Traditional confectionery goes back to ancient times, and continued to be eaten through the Middle Ages into the modern era. Sugar confectionery has developed around the properties of one ingredient a€“ Sucrose. It is a non- reducing disaccharide. The principal ingredient in all confectionery is sucrose, which in its refined form has little flavour apart from its inherent sweetness. This handbook contains Packaging in the confectionery industry, Structure of sugar confectionery, Flavouring of confectionery, Confectionery plant, Ingredients, Quality control and chemical analysis, Medicated confectionery and chewing Gum, Chocolate flow properties, General technical aspects of industrial sugar confectionery manufacture, Manufacture of liquorice paste, Extrusion cooking technology, Manufacture of invert sugar, Marzipan and crystallized confectionery. The manufacture of confectionery is not a science based industry, as these products have traditionally been created by skilled confectioners working empirically. The aim of this handbook is to give the reader a perspective on several processes and techniques which are generally followed in the confectionery industry. The texture and technological properties of confectionery products are to a large extent controlled by its structure. The book is aimed for food engineers, scientists, technologists in research and industry, as well as for new entrepreneurs and those who are engaged in this industry.It is used as a flavouring material and for imparting a characteristic brown colour to vinegar, gravy salts, sauces, meat and ... Caramel is formed when cane-sugar is heated to between 180Ad and 190AdC., or when glucose is heated to 198AdC. Water is split ... In view of the fact that there are various types of caramel offered, the user should make certain of obtaining the one best suited to his particular purpose.

Title:Confectionery Products Handbook (Chocolate, Toffees, Chewing Gum & Sugar Free Confectionery)
Author:NPCS Board
Publisher:ASIA PACIFIC BUSINESS PRESS Inc. - 2013-10-02


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