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Our understanding of the pathogenesis of hypertension and the development of new therapies for its management have each proven to be directly dependent on the availability and application of novel molecular biological methodologies. In Hypertension: Methods and Protocols, a panel of recognized experts from key institutions around the world describes in step-by-step detail many new and essential molecular techniques for cardiovascular hypertension research. The methods presented range widely from producing congenic, consomic, transgenic, and knockout models of hypertension to the gene transfer of specific genetic material using adenoviral and nonviral (polymers, liposomes, and antisense agents) vectors. Additional techniques described include single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping, RNA interference, microarray analysis, pharmacogenetics, and pharmacogenomics for the genetic dissection of hypertension, as well as a practical method for deriving cardiomyocytes from embryonic stem cells that would serve as replacement cells for those damaged by hypertension or heart attack. A review of bioinformatic resources for pharmacogenomics describes the application of in silico strategies to identify nuclear matrix attachment regions. The protocols follow the successful Methods in Molecular Medicine series format, each offering step-by-step laboratory instructions, an introduction outlining the principle behind the technique, lists of the necessary equipment and reagents, and tips on troubleshooting and avoiding known pitfalls. State-of-the-art and highly practical, Hypertension: Methods and Protocols offers both novice and experienced hypertension researchers an indispensable collection of readily reproducible techniques for successful research, work that has already dramatically improved the outlook for hypertensive patients, and promises much future success.However, the trials do not work in many cases. In order to solve this problem, we tried to modify the conventional TaqMan method. As a result, measurement of DNA in very small quantities became possible. This modified real-time PCRanbsp;...

Author:Jérôme P. Fennell, Andrew H. Baker
Publisher:Springer Science & Business Media - 2005-01-01


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